Sugar Land – Missouri City Edition | October 2022 – Community Impact

SUGAR LAND MISSOURI CITY EDITION
VOLUME 10, ISSUE 2  OCT. 5NOV. 1, 2022
Ocials plan for long-term benets of Fort Bend County EpiCenter
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Rumble Creek Grill crafts cocktails in Missouri City
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Missouri City rejects bid for Sienna Parkway
Transportation updates
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VOTER GUIDE 2022
Sample ballot
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The 230,000-square-foot facility was designed for agriculture, sports, and local school district events, ocials said. (Rendering courtesy Stonehenge Holdings LLC)
Rosenberg venue to oer countywide emergency shelter, entertainment, events
will be paid for through events at the facility, he said. Work began on the center in late 2021 and is estimated to cost more than $120 million. Construction costs are funded by the county and Stonehenge Holdings. In late July, the county also entered into an asset management agreement with the rm to provide $27 million for the facility’s pre-operation costs—a decision that was met with push- back from Precinct 3 Commissioner Andy Meyers, who represents Sugar Land and Missouri City. At the July 26 Fort Bend County Commissioners Court, Meyers CONTINUED ON 26
Missouri City studio celebrates cultural diversity
BY ASIA ARMOUR
a draw to new businesses in the surrounding area. “One beautiful thing is this facility is located in the middle of Fort Bend County; that is why we are calling it the EpiCenter,” he said. In February 2021, the county opted to enter a public-private partnership with site developer Stonehenge Holdings LLC to lease the multipurpose building with the intention of eventually owning it, George said. The operational costs
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Upon opening in summer 2023, the Fort Bend County EpiCenter will sit on 52 acres in Rosenberg, attracting visitors to the area for events from surrounding counties, ocials said. Located in the heart of Fort Bend County along Hwy. 59 and Hwy. 36, County Judge KP George said he anticipates the EpiCenter will bring millions to the county over the next decade in the form of venue rent- als, hotel stays, naming rights and
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SUGAR LAND – MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2022
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COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM
ABOUT US Owners John and Jennifer Garrett launched Community Impact Newspaper in 2005, and the company is still locally owned today. We have expanded to include hundreds of team members and have created our own software platform and printing facility. CI delivers 30 localized editions across Texas to more than 2.4 million residential mailboxes. MARKET TEAM GENERAL MANAGER Amy Martinez EDITOR Hunter Marrow GRAPHIC DESIGNER La’Toya Smith ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Debbie Hamilton METRO LEADERSHIP PUBLISHER Jason Culpepper MANAGING EDITOR Kelly Schafler COPY EDITOR Kasey Salisbury SENIOR ART PRODUCTION MANAGER Kaitlin Schmidt CONTACT US 16300 Northwest Freeway Jersey Village, TX 77040 • 281-469-6181 CI CAREERS communityimpact.com/careers PRESS RELEASES slmnews@communityimpact.com ADVERTISING slmads@communityimpact.com Learn more at communityimpact.com/advertising EMAIL NEWSLETTERS communityimpact.com/newsletter PODCAST communityimpact.com/podcast SUPPORT US Join your neighbors by giving to the CI Patron program. Funds support our journalistic mission to provide trusted, local news in your community. Learn more at communityimpact.com/cipatron
ANNOUNCEMENT: COMMUNITY IMPACT REBRANDING & NEWSROOM COMMITMENT
2005 Total mailboxes 60,000 1 journalist
2015 Total mailboxes 1.495 million 40 journalists
2022 Total mailboxes 2.45 million 75 journalists
The CI Local Pin Incorporated into our main logo, the CI Local Pin symbolizes our focus on local and making an Impact in every community we serve.
The new mission statement is: “Our mission is to provide trusted news and local information that everyone gets,” which speaks to both the editorial content and business ads that our communities love and use. The vision statement was created by all Impacters and speaks to what we hope to accomplish with each day of our work: ”Our vision is to build communities of informed citizens and thriving businesses through the collaboration of a passionate team.” There are no changes to the company’s purpose and values, and Community Impact is committed to living those out every day. CI’s purpose is: “To be a light for our readers, customers, partners and each other.” The company’s values , or stones that are physically awarded internally for a job well done each month are Faith, Passion, Quality, Innovation and Integrity. The company’s updated logo features the signature CI red and gray, but lighter, brighter and bolder. CI also incorporated a new design element—the CI Local Pin , a simple recognizable icon—into the new logo to further solidify its focus on local news and making an impact in every community it serves. The design of the new logo more accurately reflects CI’s design philosophy, Creative Director Derek Sullivan said. “Less is more—we always aim to keep it clear, clean and concise,” he said. “In addition, the new CI Local Pin helps us visually connect the main brand with our other internal and external initiatives. For example, the pin is part of our IRG logos (Impacter Resource Groups promoting equity, diversity and inclusion), and the pin is shifted upside down to become an ink drop in our new CI Printing logo." Vice President of Sales and Marketing Tess Coverman said CI’s updated name speaks to the company’s robust product line and allows for continued innovation in the future. “As new ideas come up, as long as they filter through our updated mission statement and core values, we can more easily introduce them to the Community Impact audience,” she said. “For example, hosting events is a recent request by some CI Patrons as a benefit to the community and a new revenue stream, which we might consider in 2023.” With this brand update and newsroom expansion, CI prides itself on being the largest community journalism newsroom in the state, covering local businesses, transportation and road projects, development, health care and government.
No longer just a newspaper company, Community Impact is rebranding to better align with one of its core values: innovation.
Although many readers may know CI for its monthly, full-color print newspapers, the company is much more than just a printed newspaper. Since its inception in 2005 in the gameroom of John and Jennifer Garrett’s home in Pflugerville, Texas, the company lived up to its entrepreneurial roots, creating its own in-house customer relationship management software, building a printing plant, launching email newsletters and podcasts, and expanding its reach to four Texas metros and more than 2.4 million homes. To reflect its entire product line and continue to allow for future growth, the media company has changed its name from Community Impact Newspaper to Community Impact. This process began in early 2022 when leadership at CI completed a workshop with Jeff Hahn of Hahn Public to strategize their next innovative move. Following the workshop, CI made the decision to update its entire brand schematic, including the logo, colors, tagline, mission statement and vision statement. "Since 2005, Community Impact has been a trusted source for local news as we have built the largest community journalism news organization in Texas,” CEO and founder John Garrett said. “Our award-winning monthly newspaper and our innovative daily digital products will be the focus of the investment Jennifer and I are making in local news for—God willing—years to come. Our team is committed to helping all Texans we serve, regardless of your socioeconomic status or political affiliation, to get news you can trust to help you connect to your community." In an effort to produce even more local journalism, CI has already promoted 10 editorial team members since January and will add more newsroom positions in the coming months to maintain its status as the leading newsroom in the state. A portion of this growth is attributed to local CI advertisers along with CI’s reader-funded Patron program that launched in 2020. The company plans to expand with a corporate Patron program in 2023 based on similar demand. As part of the rebrand, the company’s new tagline , News Everyone Gets, was shortened from Local. Useful. Everyone Gets It. to mirror what CI does best—simplify complex information into various news formats in a delivery method and tone accessible to anyone. Plus, CI created a new mission statement and updated its vision statement to reflect both present-day and future goals.
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SUGAR LAND – MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2022
IMPACTS
Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding
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COURTESY CORDOVAN ART SCHOOL
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family-owned restaurant oers gourmet comfort food and craft cocktails made from scratch in-house daily. 281-881-7220. www.ramblecreekgrill.com 5 Fast-casual juice and smoothie bar concept Main Squeeze Juice Co. held its grand opening Sept. 23-25 for its location at 8735 Hwy. 6, Ste. C, Missouri City, in Sienna. The new location is owned by local entrepreneur Grant Navarre, marking his second location, joining his rst in Sugar Land. Main Squeeze specializes in frozen fruit smoothies and cold-pressed juice and sells toast, acai bowls and coee. 832-440-7157. www.mainsqueezejuiceco.com 6 The Anime Bar , a bar themed around anime and manga with memorabilia, gures and artwork, opened Aug. 27 at 11773 S. Hwy. 6, Sugar Land. The bar oers specialty cocktails themed around anime and manga, Japanese and domestic beers, anime watch parties and karaoke. Guests must be age 21 years or older to enter. 346-309-2906. www.animematsuri.com 7 Sugaring NYC , the franchise concept utilizing the sugaring Brazilian hair removal method, opened a new franchise location in Sugar Land in mid-September, store ocials said. The location, 13513 University Blvd., Ste. B701, brings waxing that uses sugaring paste applied at room tempera- ture. The ingredients are 100% natural, made up of lemon juice, water and sugar. 346-309-4943. www.sugaringnyc.com COMING SOON 8 Department of Wonder , an enter- tainment concept combining interactive theater with emerging technologies,
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NOW OPEN 1 Riverstone Pharmacy & Wellness , a locally owned community pharmacy, held its grand opening Sept. 17 at 18721 University Blvd., Ste. 130, Sugar Land. The pharmacy oers various services, including compounding, COVID-19 testing, medication synchronization, con- sultations, u shots, health screenings, immunizations, multidose packaging, over-the-counter drug services, pet care and travel vaccinations. 281-207-6049. www.riverstonerx.com
2 Cordovan Art School , an art school bringing classes in drawing, oil painting, anime, watercolor, clay and acrylic, was set to hold its grand opening Oct. 1, after press time, at 3219 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land. Cordovan held a soft opening in late May. During the grand opening, Cor- dovan planned to hold free art classes, 50% o pottery painting and discounts on fall class registration. 281-637-0017. www.cordovanartschool.com 3 Quick Quack Car Wash held a soft opening for its second Sugar Land location at 7510 Hwy. 90 on Aug. 4 and held its
grand opening Sept. 13. The car wash chain provides fast, guided service and brush- less technology. It oered 12 days of free car washes from Sept. 14-25 to celebrate the opening. The opening comes after Quick Quack Car Wash opened a car wash in the Woodbridge Shopping Center in Sugar Land in February. The chain has over 155 locations across Arizona, California, Colorado, Texas and Utah. 888-772-2792. www.dontdrivedirty.com 4 Ramble Creek Grill Riverstone was set to open Oct. 1, after press time, at 7022 S. Hwy. 6, Missouri City. The
      
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Ramble Creek Grill Riverstone
Popshelf
Q’s Deli opened Sept. 5 in Missouri City, oering a variety of halal sandwiches.
COURTESY RAMBLE CREEK GRILL RIVERSTONE
COURTESY POPSHELF
COURTESY Q’S DELI
11 Korean-style eatery Two Hands Corn Dogs has slated its upcoming Sugar Land opening for the last week of October. The concept, opening at 3540 Hwy. 6, Sugar Land, will be located in The Shops at Williams Trace shopping mall. The eatery will oer Korean-style street corn dogs, such as a potato dog, a corn dog wrapped with potato cubes and slathered with the Two Hands Dirty Sauce, and the American classic dog with mustard and ketchup. Two Hands has locations across the U.S., including locations in California, Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Georgia, Virginia and New York. www.twohandsus.com 12 Utah-based cookie maker Crumbl Cookies has led a permit for a renovation project at a future bakery location in Sugar Land, according to the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. Crumbl Cook- ies will open at 2735 Town Center Blvd. N. Ste. E in early 2023 after a renovation project scheduled to span Oct. 24-Jan. 20. The brand oers a rotating menu, specialty cookies and ice cream avors. www.crumblcookies.com NEW OWNERSHIP 13 Society Cycle Works , a Sugar Land bike shop at 13425 University Blvd., Ste. 100, went under new ownership Sept. 15, store ocials told Community Impact. The store was bought out by Trek Bicycle Corp., a bicycle and cycling product manufacturer and distributor under brand names Trek, Electra Bicycle Co., Bontrager and Diamant Bikes. The store oers mountain, road, city and electric bikes as well as parts, acces- sories, apparel and repair services. 346-291-1214. www.trekbikes.com
will open to the public Oct. 7. Located at 2180 Lone Star Drive in Sugar Land Town Square, the venue will bring a mixed-reali- ty quest in which guests are given a special lantern and charged with bringing light to darkness by unraveling stories and solving puzzles. The concept is designed for adults and children. Department of Wonder pushed back the original opening date, which had been scheduled for April 24. www.deptofwonder.com 9 Premier Martial Arts will open a new studio in late November at 2440 Settlers Way Blvd., Sugar Land. Premier Martial Arts will bring blended classes that oer students age 3 and older lessons in karate, krav maga, kickboxing and taekwondo, franchise owner Paula Gomes said. Gomes said she will work on instilling a new virtue into students every month and work with local schools to provide after-school pro- gramming. The Sugar Land studio will be the franchise owner’s second location. The rst is located at 8019 W. Grand Parkway S., Ste. 1070, Richmond. 832-777-3506. www.premiermartialarts.com 10 A new Popshelf location is on the horizon in Sugar Land, according to a permit found in the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation’s database. The retail store, a concept by Dollar General that debuted in Tennessee in 2020, will open in Sugar Land at 2428 Hwy. 6 in early 2023. The concept oers on-trend seasonal and home decor, health and beauty products, home cleaning supplies and party goods, according to the Pop- shelf website. The new location is part of a greater expansion eort by Popshelf, which announced in late 2021 it was looking to open 1,000 stores by the end of 2025. www.popshelf.com
FEATURED IMPACT NOW OPEN A new deli oering halal-focused cold- cut sandwiches and burgers opened in Sugar Land. Q’s Deli , 13134 Dairy Ashford Road, Sugar Land, held a soft opening on Labor Day, Sept. 5, bringing a variety of deli sandwiches, such as paninis, the Reuben and a classic club as well as other items, including cheeseburgers and chicken and brisket sandwiches. However, Q’s Deli ensures every menu item is halal, which means it adheres to Islamic law, despite the wide range of options, owner Ali Qureshi said. “There is zero pork in this store,” Qureshi said. “Every meat that you see is completely halal. The meat isn’t dierent in any way, but we’re the rst ones to have all of these cold cuts in completely halal form.” Qureshi opened Q’s Deli after growing up in delis; he celebrated his rst birthday at his father’s franchise location of the sandwich franchise Blimpies.
In 2012, Qureshi became a franchise owner of Murphy’s Deli in Dallas. Later, he owned a few in the Houston area. Still, the idea of opening a halal-focused deli never went away, he said. For Muslims looking for American cuisine, to stay halal they must settle for a cheeseburger, a Philly cheesesteak or a hot chicken sandwich, Qureshi said. “I think we’ll bring something that they have never seen before,” he said. In addition, as a Houston Rockets fan, the interior of Q’s Deli is adorned with basketball shoes and Rockets memorabilia on display. He also encouraged all guests, not just Muslims, to stop by and enjoy a sandwich. 281-302-6894. www.qs-deli.com
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SCHOOL NOTES 14 Harmony Public Schools , a
Aug. 29, built to serve 900 students in ninth to 12th grades in Fort Bend County. The Sugar Land school was granted an A rating by the Texas Education Agency across seven areas: English language arts and reading, mathematics, science, social studies, comparative academic growth, postsecondary readiness and compar- ative Closing the Gaps. 281-302-6445. www.hsisl.harmonytx.org
Texas-based pre-K-12 college prepara- tory charter school system, opened a new building for one of its schools at 13738 Old Richmond Road, Sugar Land. The school, Harmony School of Innova- tion—Sugar Land, opened the new building
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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2022
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TRANSPORTATION UPDATES City Council rejects bid for Sienna Parkway improvement project
COMPILED BY RENEE FARMER, HUNTER MARROW & SAAB SAHI
ONGOING PROJECTS
VOSS RD.
PAUSING THE PROJECT Missouri City City Council denied a bid for the rst phase of the Sienna Parkway improvement project due to high costs. City sta will now evaluate options to reduce the cost.
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During its Sept. 19 meeting, Missouri City City Council denied a bid for the rst phase of a widening and improvement project on Sienna Parkway, worth $4.85 million. City ocials had estimated the bid would come in close to $2.5 million, said Shashi Kumar, director of public works and city engineer. “The engineer’s estimate was a little over $2.5 million, and the bids came in at $4.8 million, well above the engineer’s estimate,” he said. Funded through a partnership between Fort Bend County and the Sienna Management District, which manages 345 acres within Missouri City’s city limits, the project aims to increase capacity at intersections along Sienna Parkway between the limits of Hwy. 6 and McKeever Road. The project was slated to start this summer but was delayed when
the city received no bids in April when the bidding process originally started, Kumar said in a Sept. 19 email to Community Impact . In addition, the price of the low bid coming in above expectations can be attributed to rising fuel prices and supply chain issues, city sta wrote in the agenda report. Missouri City will now go back and evaluate value engineering options to reduce the cost of the project before going back out to bid once more, Kumar said. Kumar said he expects construc- tion to start in January. The project will add a series of turn lanes and median enhancements. It will also widen shoulders at the intersections of Hwy. 6, Trammel Fresno Road, Sienna Springs Boulevard, Watts Plantation Road, Sienna Ranch Road and McKeever Road.
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Voss Road at Hwy. 6 right-turn lane A Fort Bend County mobility bond project looking to add a right-turn lane eastbound on Voss Road at Hwy. 6 is still underway. The project will remove the existing concrete pavement, curb, driveways and pedestrian ramps to make way for a new 11-foot right-turn lane. Timeline: rst quarter 2022-rst quarter 2023 Cost: $355,441 Funding source: Fort Bend County mobility bond
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ALL INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED AS OF SEPT. 22. NEWS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THESE OR OTHER LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS? EMAIL US AT SLMNEWSCOMMUNITYIMPACT.COM. would be located in the future devel- opment, Fort Bend Town Center III. Timeline: scal year 2022-23 Cost: $52 million Funding source: METRO New Missouri City Park & Ride The board for the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County voted Sept. 22 to negotiate with NewQuest Properties to a long-term lease for a future park and ride facility at Fort Bend Tollway and Hwy. 6. If a future contract is approved, the facility
TxDOT launches new travel app for Houston The Texas Department of Transportation on Sept. 16 launched its new mobility app, Houston carpools for high-occu- pancy vehicle lanes, and get The app covers Austin, Brazoria, Chambers, Colo- rado, Fort Bend, Galveston, Harris, Liberty, Matagorda, Montgomery, Waller, Whar-
APP BREAKDOWN The Texas Department of Transportation spent years collaborating with multiple agencies to develop ConnectSmart. 2016 Year of proposal
free emergency roadside assistance from Tow and Go, per the website. Routes can be custom- ized with lters such as speed or safety for cyclists. The app oers various transit options from public transportation to bike rent- als, according to a Sept. 16 news release.
ConnectSmart, which oers users various travel options to optimize commutes in the Greater Houston area. Commuters can use the app to nd ideal routes and nearby parking, view trac conditions through road- side cameras, form private
ton and Walker counties. The app’s development cost about $17.8 million and was partially funded by various partners and an $8.9 million federal grant, according to the 2016 initial project proposal.
$17.8M Cost to develop 11 collaborators
SOURCE: TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION COMMUNITY IMPACT
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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2022
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GOVERNMENT Cities of Sugar Land, Missouri City approve FY 2022-23 budgets
BY RENEE FARMER & HUNTER MARROW
nearly 10% increase due to the corresponding increase in property values. The average resi- dential tax bill will increase by $100 from last year’s bill. Missouri City Missouri City residents will pay $0.57375 per $100 valuation in property taxes to the city. That tax rate is made up of a maintenance and oper- ations rate of $0.431981 and a debt service rate of $0.141769. The total tax rate was reduced by 0.74% compared to last year from $0.578035 to $0.57375. Though the rate was lowered, rising property values and the addition of new properties mean Missouri City will generate $53.2 million in prop- erty tax revenue, an increase from the revenue raised from last year’s rate, Missouri City Finan- cial Services Director Allena Portis said. For the city’s revenue, Missouri City sees a 16.6% increase in revenue and a 4.4% decrease in expen- ditures from FY 2021-22. “For the general fund, this is intentional,” Portis said. “This is us spending some of our fund bal- ance on one-time expenditures. For other funds, it is spending fund balance such as bond proceeds or other fund balance that’s been collected for future projects.” Revenue and transfers in for the city’s general fund—the fund supporting the city’s operating expenses—is projected at $63.5 million, a 6.3% increase from last year’s budget. The city is pro- jecting $72.6 million in expenditures and transfers out from the general fund, a 3.1% increase. Missouri City’s budget supports a net increase of 27 full-time employees, bringing the total number of full-time city employees to 428. Five are in the fire department, and four are in the police department, interim City Manager Sedrick Cole said. The budget also includes the addition of six full-time positions in public works and eight positions in the parks and recreation department, in addition to $2 million to address salaries.
The cities of Sugar Land and Missouri City approved their fiscal year 2022-23 budgets in mid-September with both cities facing increased revenues. During its Sept. 20 meeting, Sugar Land City Council approved a budget with revenue and transfers totaling $418.5 million. Missouri City City Council, meanwhile, approved a budget with revenue and transfers totaling $193.4 million. Sugar Land Sugar Land will keep last year’s tax rate and invest $99 million in capital projects in the upcoming fiscal year. The city projects $382 million in expenditures in the upcoming fiscal year, including $282.8 million for operating funds and $99.2 million for capital projects. “That’s a significant investment, and those projects will pay dividends going forward for the community,” Director of Budget and Strategy Scott Butler said during the meeting. Butler said the city aims to make strategic investments in its highest-priority areas in the upcoming fiscal year: reliable infrastructure, qual- ity of life, champion workforce and public safety. Sugar Land also adopted its five-year capital improvements program totaling nearly $297 million planned from 2023-27 with $42.6 million allocated for drainage and $21.1 million for streets in 2023. The city also approved its FY 2022-23 tax rate of $0.3465 per $100 valuation at the meeting. The rate includes $0.200061 for maintenance and operations and $0.146439 for debt service. This presents no increase from last year’s rate. However, Sugar Land shifted approximately $0.009 from the maintenance and operations rate to the debt service rate to accelerate drainage, street and public safety projects from the voter-approved 2019 general obligation bond, Butler said. The rate will raise more revenue from property taxes than last year’s budget by $5.7 million, a
AN INCREASE IN REVENUES
The cities of Sugar Land and Missouri City have experienced increased revenues over the last year with total revenues for the two cities now reaching over $548 million.
Charges for service $115.9M, 30.6% Other revenues $60.9M, 16.1% Property tax $60.7M, 16.1% Sales tax $57.5M, 15.3% SUGAR LAND MAJOR REVENUE SOURCES
Total: $378M
Bond proceeds $74.3M, 19.7%
Other taxes $8.5M, 2.3%
MISSOURI CITY MAJOR REVENUE SOURCES
Total: $170M
Property tax $58.7M, 34.5% Other sources $52.4M, 30.9% Charges for service $28.2M, 16.6% Sales tax $17.7M, 10.4% Franchise revenue $4.2M, 2.5%
Licenses and permits $4.2M, 2.5% Grants $4.5M, 2.7%
SOURCES: CITY OF SUGAR LAND, CITY OF MISSOURI CITY/ COMMUNITY IMPACT
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SUGAR LAND – MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2022
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Safe Area 19.2 in x 11.25 in
Keep all text and critical images inside this line. This is the final size of the double truck ad.
Bleed Area (0.25 in bleed)
20.5 in x 12.5 in
Gutte
Instructions: • Doubletruck needs to be designed within the safe area and exported with bleed • Avoid text in the gutter • Final specs with bleed should be 20.5 in x 12.5 in • Export PDF as a spread • For doubletrucks designed in-house, export the doubletruck at the CI – In Paper Ads preset (modified by selecting “Export as spread” instead of “as pages.”) This is the final size of the PDF that gets sent through the job jacket and Automator. Come home to great savings. 18-hole golf course Outdoor stage & biergarten Onsite lifestyle director 2-story fitness center
0.8326 i
Resort-style outdoor pool
100s of monthly activities
Junior-Olympic indoor lap pool
Golf clubhouse – coming soon!
Pickleball & bocce ball courts
Additional restaurant – coming soon!
Bleed
Safe Area
19.2 in x 11.25 in
Keep all text and critical images inside this line. This is the final size of the double truck ad.
20.5 in x 12.5 in Bleed Area (0.25 in bleed) This is the final size of the PDF that gets sent through the job jacket and Automator.
Gutter
.8326 in
save up to $20K on select homes & homesites through November 15. * When you live at Kissing Tree, every day is like a vacation. Play 18 holes. Meet up with friends in the Biergarten. Swim in the resort-style pool or the indoor lap pool. You can become part of the community as soon as you sign your contract. Our newest Texas-sized amenities are underway, with a new golf clubhouse, restaurant, and more pickleball courts coming soon! Choose your floor plan and homesite, or browse our wide selection of quick move-in homes with features and interiors planned by our design experts. Scan the QR code or visit KissingTree.com to see available homes, or call 512-842-4902 to find out how you can save thousands.
*Minimum $40,000 spend in Design Center for Traditional Homes and $20,000 spend for Cottage Homes. Villa Homes $10,000 credit would be applied towards pre-selected options. Offer good for homes sold between September 15 and November 15, 2022. Brookfield Residential reserves the right to make modifications in materials and specifications at any time without prior notice. © 2022 Brookfield Residential Properties Inc. All rights reserved.
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COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM
NEWS BRIEFS
Enhanced training, protective equipment targets for Fort Bend County grant application
SAFETY FUNDING BREAKDOWN
in state funds was dedicated to law enforcement training and protective equipment in Texas. $53M is the amount Fort Bend County Sheri’s Oce applied for to address safety. $783,151 was allocated in June from the state to support school safety and mental health initiatives. $105.5M
BY ASIA ARMOUR
oce to support additional school safety and mental health initiatives through August 2023, including $3 million for local law enforcement agencies to oset travel expenditures for Advanced Law Enforce- ment Rapid Response Training and $50 million for bullet-resistant shields. Elizabeth Signorotti, grant coordinator for the Fort Bend County Sheri’s Oce, said her department is the third priority for this initiative as Abbott’s oce “is looking mainly to provide schools and school personnel with bullet-resistant shields.” Signorotti said this grant will only fund equipment with a designation of Level III or higher. Another requirement is that all recipients receive
On Sept. 13, the Fort Bend County Sheri’s Oce submitted a grant application to Gov. Greg Abbott’s public safety oce for a portion of the $53 million the state has dedicated to law enforcement active- shooter training and protective equipment. The sheri’s oce and all four county precincts’ police programs are vying for $783,151 in grant funds for scal year 2022-23 to provide bullet-re- sistant shields to local law enforcement. This state-sponsored initiative comes after the Uvalde elementary school shooting in May. In June, Abbott and other Texas legislative lead- ership transferred $105.5 million to the public safety
SOURCE: FORT BEND COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT
ALERRT, which teaches responders eective strate- gies to respond to active attack events, according to the oce of the Texas governor’s website. The application deadline was Sept. 19. The sheri’s oce expects a decision within the next two months.
Housing inventory highest in 2 years
Contingent upon election, FBISD board OKs supplemental compensation program
BY GEORGE WIEBE
MARKET UPDATE The Greater Houston area’s real estate market has continued to cool down, experts report.
For the fth straight month, the Houston area’s housing market cooled down as the total number of property sales year over year declined 15.8%, according to the Houston Association of Realtors’ August market update. The decline in single-family home sales from 9,918 in August 2021 to 8,241 in August 2022 is a 16.9% year-over-year decrease. The dwindling buyers market led to a signicant boost in the sin- gle-family home months of inventory to 2.5 months, the highest level in two years. Inationary prices and rising interest rates led consumers to pivot toward the rental market as the median single-family price rose 10.8% year over year, according to
BY HUNTER MARROW
of assessed property value. In the rst year of the program— FY 2022-23—employees who have completed up to four years will receive $500, while employees who have completed ve to nine years would receive $1,000. Starting in year two—FY 2023-24— FBISD will pay out about $100 per year of service to employees who reach milestones of ve, 10, 15, 20 and 25 years and beyond. The rst year of funding comes from FBISD’s remaining Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief funds. The cost in year two and beyond is estimated to be $2.2 million annually and would be funded out of the general fund.
The Fort Bend ISD board of trustees approved a resolution Sept. 19 approving a supplemental compensation program based on eligible employees’ years of service in the district. With the approval, the program provides one-time supplemental payments worth $13.2 million in the rst year. The funding is contingent upon a majority of registered voters approving an upcoming tax rate election slated for the ballot Nov. 8. The board of trustees approved the tax rate election Aug. 22, proposing a $0.0755 tax rate increase and bringing the proposed scal year 2022-23 tax rate to $1.2101 per $100
$341,950 was the median home price in August. 16.9% FEWER HOMES were sold in August 2022 than in August 2021.
SOURCE: HOUSTON ASSOCIATION OF REALTORSCOMMUNITY IMPACT
HAR ocials. While the median single-family home value did increase over last August, the price fell from $348,740 in July to $341,950 in August.
Public education is always on the ballot. And the countdown to the legislative session is on.
Join us to get engaged in supporting our teachers, students, and schools.
Visit us at RaiseYourHandTexas.org
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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2022
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SUGAR LAND – MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2022
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COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM
2022
VOTER GUIDE GUIDE
Candidates and information for general elections
COMPILED BY HUNTER MARROW
DATES TO KNOW Oct. 24 First day of early voting
Voters in Fort Bend County can vote at any of the county’s polling centers during both the early-voting period and on Election Day. A list of polling locations is published at www.fortbendcountytx.gov. Proposition language has been lightly edited for space. SOURCES: TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE, FORT BEND COUNTYCOMMUNITY IMPACT WHERE TO VOTE
Nov. 8 Election Day Nov. 8 Last day to receive ballot by mail (or Nov. 9 if carrier envelope is postmarked by 7 p.m. at location of election on Election Day)
Oct. 28 Last day to apply for ballot by mail (received, not postmarked) Nov. 4 Last day of early voting
Only candidates in contested elections are included.
SAMPLE BALLOT
R Republican
D Democrat
L Libertarian
G Green
*Incumbent STATE Governor
Missouri City At-Large Position 1 Sonya Brown-Marshall Vashaundra Edwards* Missouri City At-Large Position 2 Bruce Zaborowski Lynn Clouser* FORT BEND ISD VOTER APPROVAL TAX RATE ELECTION Proposition A Ratifying the ad valorem tax rate of $1.2101 for the current year, a rate that will result in an increase of 7.31 percent in maintenance and operations tax revenue as compared to the preceding year, which is an additional $47.66 million. LAMAR CISD BOND Proposition A Issuance of $1,310,611,605 of bonds to construct, acquire, renovate and equip school buildings, for purchasing necessary sites for school buildings, for purchasing new school buses, for retrotting school buses with emergency,
safety, or security equipment, and for purchasing or retrotting vehicles to be used for emergency, safety, or security purposes. Proposition B Issuance of $189,241,920 of bonds for constructing, renovating, acquiring, and equipping career and technology facilities, including a district-wide career and technology center and renovating existing career and technology facilities, and purchasing the necessary sites. Proposition C Issuance of $16,769,775 of bonds for acquiring or updating district technology equipment. Proposition D Issuance of $4,978,501 of bonds for constructing, renovating, acquiring, and equipping improvements for Traylor Stadium. Proposition E Issuance of $194,904,700 of bonds for constructing, acquiring, and equipping a second district stadium and purchasing the necessary site.
R Wayne Christian* D Luke Warford L Jaime Andres Diez G Hunter Crow Justice, Supreme Court, Place 3 R Debra Lehrmann* D Erin A. Nowell L Thomas Edward Oxford Justice, Supreme Court, Place 9 R Evan Young* D Julia Maldonado Judge, Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 5 R Scott Walker* D Dana Human Judge, Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 6 R Jesse F. McClure III* D Robert Johnson Texas House, District 26 R Jacey Jetton* D Daniel Lee Texas House, District 27 R Sohrab Gilani D Ron Reynolds* Texas House, District 28 R Gary Gates*
D Nelvin J. Adriatico FEDERAL U.S. House of Representatives, District 7 R Johnny Teague D Lizzie Fletcher* U.S. House of Representatives, District 22 R Troy Nehls* D Jamie Jordan L Joseph LeBlanc LOCAL Fort Bend County judge R Trever J. Nehls D KP George* Fort Bend County Precinct 2 commissioner R Melissa M. Wilson D Grady Prestage* Fort Bend County Precinct 4
R Greg Abbott* D Beto O’Rourke L Mark Tippetts G Delilah Barrios Lieutenant governor
R Dan Patrick* D Mike Collier L Shanna Steele Attorney general R Ken Paxton* D Rochelle Mercedes Garza L Mark Ash Comptroller of public accounts R Glenn Hegar* D Janet T. Dudding L V. Alonzo Echevarria-Garza Commissioner of the General Land Oce R Dawn Buckingham D Jay Kleberg G Alfred Molison Jr. Commissioner of agriculture
commissioner R Ray Aguilar D Dexter McCoy Missouri City mayor Robin Elackatt* Yolanda Ford
R Sid Miller* D Susan Hays Railroad commissioner
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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2022
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LEAGUE CITY | TEXAS MEDICAL CENTER | THE WOODLANDS | WEST HOUSTON
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CANDIDATE INFO
Get to know candidates running in November’s midterm elections
2022 VOTER GUIDE
Republican
Democrat
R
D
Incumbent
COMPILED BY RENEE FARMER, HUNTER MARROW & GEORGE WIEBE
U.S. House of Representatives, District 7
Fort Bend County Precinct 2 commissioner
JOHNNY TEAGUE
MELISSA M. WILSON
Occupation: pastor, author, rancher Relevant experience: former accountant for Shell, I am attentive, responsive, work hard, and committed to honest representation. 281-924-4460 www.johnnyteague.com
Candidate did not respond by press time.
R
R
LIZZIE FLETCHER
GRADY PRESTAGE
Candidate did not respond by press time.
Candidate did not respond by press time.
D
D
Texas House, District 27
Fort Bend County Precinct 4 commissioner
SOHRAB GILANI
RAY AGUILAR
Candidate did not respond by press time.
Candidate did not respond by press time.
R
R
DEXTER MCCOY
RON REYNOLDS
Occupation: self-employed Relevant experience: appointee in Obama administration; Fort Bend ISD administrator; board member, Gulf Coast Workforce board; chief of sta, Fort Bend County Judge KP George 832-278-1732 www.dextermccoy.com
Candidate did not respond by press time.
D
D
GARY GATES Texas House, District 28
ROBIN J. ELACKATT Missouri City mayor
Occupation: businessman Relevant experience: State representative: served Fort Bend County for 2.5 years in the Texas House. Education advocate: advo- cate for equal opportunity for all students. 713-899-7870 www.gatesfortexas.com
Occupation: small-business owner – Missouri City Relevant experience: vice chairman and board member for MC parks board, Missouri City City Council for six years, Missouri City small-business owner, completing my rst term. contact@mayorrobin.com www.mayorrobin.com
R
NELVIN J. ADRIATICO
YOLANDA FORD
Occupation: real estate broker/developer Relevant experience: As a teacher’s son, I learned the value of hard work and respecting others. As a business owner and leader, I under- stand the importance of creating good-paying jobs. 713-331-6245 www.nelvinfortexas.com
Occupation: land development consultant/urban planner Relevant experience: former Missouri City mayor, three terms Missouri City council member, former Missouri City planner, 20 years of experience in leadership, community development 281-410-1307 www.yolandaford.com
D
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SUGAR LAND  MISSOURI CITY EDITION • OCTOBER 2022
CANDIDATE INFO
Get to know candidates running in November’s midterm elections
Republican
Democrat
R
D
Incumbent
Missouri City At-Large Position 1
Missouri City At-Large Position 2
SONYA BROWNMARSHALL
BRUCE ZABOROWSKI
Occupation: CEO and Texas licensed Realtor Relevant experience: business executive with strategic initia- tives, budgeting and project management experience. 18 years, Missouri City planning and zoning commission and chairwoman 713-977-6644 www.sonyabrownmarshall.com
Occupation: retired outside telephone technician, Verizon Texas land line operations Relevant experience: ve years experience director on South- west Harris County Municipal Utility District No. 1, 40-year resident of Missouri City 713-933-5490
VASHAUNDRA EDWARDS
LYNN CLOUSER
Occupation: program director for juvenile probation Relevant experience: served on community development advi- sory committee, served on nance, economic development, and planning, development and infrastructure committees 281-401-9469 www.vedwards.org
Occupation: director of marketing Relevant experience: Missouri City homeowner, resident for 18 years; current City Council member At-Large, Position 2 since December 2020; council committees: small-business advisory, economic development, nance and services 281-403-8500 www.lynnclouser.com
Only candidates in contested elections are included. Go to county election websites for information on uncontested races.
For more election coverage, go to www.communityimpact.com/voter-guide.
on texas faves! Big Saves
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